LEGO SERIOUS PLAY Helps Build a Shared Understanding between the Scrum Team and the Product Owner

February 25, 2015 in Serious Play Case Studies

by Stan Kurkovsky, kurkovsky@ccsu.edu, @SKurkovsky

Scrum is an agile iterative software development methodology in which a team of software developers works in well defined increments (sprints). Each sprint typically results in adding new features to the software product. LEGO SERIOUS PLAY has been successfully adapted both for team building and as a tool for conducting sprint retrospectives in Scrum software development projects. A retrospective is a meeting of the entire development team facilitated by the Scrum Master and conducted at the end of each sprint, during which the team reflects on the past sprint and answers two key questions: what went well and what can be improved during the next sprint? If applied properly, LEGO SERIOUS PLAY can make sprint retrospectives more productive by getting people to discuss their experiences in the last sprint more openly and communicate their ideas in a more constructive way.

Individual Strength: Flexibility When Working with Constraints - by Stan Kurkovsky

Individual Strength: Flexibility When Working with Constraints – by Stan Kurkovsky

It is relatively easy to make the development team members to communicate with each other since they all work on the same project on the daily basis, and they most likely share a similar background and experience in various aspects of software development. However, ensuring clear communication between the Scrum team and the product owner is not always an easy goal to achieve. A product owner is typically a lead user of the software being developed. The main responsibility of the product owner is to establish a clear vision for the product being built, which is accomplished by writing project specification in the form of prioritized user stories. In practice, a product owner does not always understand the problems the developers may be facing in order to build what the product owner wants. And vice versa, the developers may not always have a clear idea of what the product owner really needs. This situation is perfectly illustrated in this infamous comic.

Read the rest of this entry →

Using Lego Serious Play to teach Software Engineering

January 12, 2015 in Serious Play Case Studies

by Stan Kurkovsky, kurkovsky@ccsu.edu, @SKurkovsky

Software engineering courses at the post-secondary level usually integrate students’ programming skills with their knowledge in many other areas of computing, such as databases, security, or computer networks. Software engineering, however, is much more than simply putting existing knowledge and skills to practice. There are many important principles and concepts that are central to the practice of modern software engineering, such as requirements engineering, emergent properties, socio-technical systems, etc. Given the engineering nature of the discipline, one of the best ways to learn these principles is usually to apply them in a practical context, such as a case study.

Lego Serious Play Case Study for Software Engineering - by Stan Kurkovski

Lego Serious Play Case Study for Software Engineering – by Stan Kurkovsky

Recently, we began using LEGO SERIOUS PLAY as a foundation for hands-on case studies to teach the core concepts of software engineering to senior (4th year) students at a university. As with all LEGO SERIOUS PLAY workshops, students were first introduced to  LEGO SERIOUS PLAY by participating in a skill building session, which took an entire 75-minute period. All of our case studies went beyond building individual models and included building either a shared, a landscape model, or both, which promotes team building and creating of shared understanding. These two kinds of models force students to compare their thoughts and views on the same concept, which helps each student correct any possible misconceptions and crystallize their understanding of that concept. We piloted several LSP-based case studies, one of which is described below.

Read the rest of this entry →

Send a question

We are a group of volunteers and may not respond right away. But soon! :-)

Sending

©2009-2019 SeriousPlayPro.com. SeriousPlayPro.com links professional facilitators using LEGO® SERIOUS PLAY® methodology. It is not affiliated with LEGO. Check LEGO SERIOUS PLAY open source for details or get in touch with us.

See also our Privacy Policy and Frequently Asked Questions about LEGO SERIOUS PLAY

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

Create Account